Posts Tagged ‘Alberto Fujimori’

Bolivia, her dictators jailed for life

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

[Translation of an opinion piece from La Jornada of Mexico City for May 25, 2013. See original here. Jorge Mansilla Torres is a Bolivian writer]

By Jorge Mansilla Torres

In May, 1995, the Bolivian judicial system sentenced former dictator Luis García Meza to 30 years in prison for his crimes against the people and the state. At the beginning of this century, Peru tried and convicted former dictator Fujimori, as Argentina did with its own bloodthirsty military plunderers.

General Videla was sentenced twice to life in prison and died in the solitude of his cell a few days ago. Now former Guatemalan president Ríos Montt tries sleight of hand against the 80-year sentence handed him for his horrendous crimes of exterminating the Indians. These examples of dignity occur when there is historical memory and when the people take it upon themselves to give up their rancor in exchange for justice being done.

García Meza will be locked away in the high-security prison in Chonchocoro, at an altitude of 3,800 meters in the altiplano of La Paz, until he is 93 years old. With him, in the adjoining cell, is Colonel Luis Arce Gómez, his former minister of the interior, both of them convicted of the assassination of some 500 citizens, of torture and persecution of another 4,000, of at least 90 forced disappearances, of attacks on fiscal resources and of cocaine trafficking from the very presidency of the republic. (more…)

Thatcher, the legacy

Friday, April 12th, 2013

x thatcherpinochet[Translation of an article from El Clarín of Santiago, Chile, for April 9, 2013. See original here.]

by Pedro Miguel

The first instance of Thatcherism took place six years before Margaret Thatcher arrived at the head of the British government; specifically, it began on September 11, 1973, when a group of military men — urged on by Richard Nixon, his secretary of state, Henry Kissinger, then Vice President Gerald Ford and George Bush, senior, who was serving as Washington’s representative to the UN — destroyed Chilean democracy, assassinated thousands of citizens, kidnapped, jailed and tortured tens of thousands. Tens of thousands more were to leave in exile. Once installed, the dictatorship headed by Augusto Pinochet dissolved Congress, declared political parties illegal and, a couple of years later, handed economic management over to a small group of post-graduates from the University of Chicago, where Milton Friedman was teaching, hence the name Chicago Boys: Sergio de Castro, José Piñera, Jorge Cauas, Pablo Barahona… (more…)

The peculiarities of Peruvian politics

Sunday, January 13th, 2013

((Héctor Béjar))

Héctor Béjar believes Peru lacks a cohesive social movement to confront the dominant economic powers

[Translation of an interview from Brasil de Fato of São Paulo for January 10, 2013. See original here.]

By Marcio Zonta

The Peruvian political scene, from the revolutionary military government of General Juan Velasco Alvarado, through the armed conflicts between the military and the senderistas (members of the armed Sendero Luminoso group), to the mafiosi governments of Fujimori and Alan García, then the appearance of Ollanta Humala, have always embodied elements different from other Latin American political processes.

In a frank and revealing conversation with Brasil de Fato, former combatant from the ranks of Che Guevara’s guerrillas and now professor in the sociology department of the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Lima, Héctor Béjar offers a thoughtful account of the course of Peruvian politics. (more…)

Peru: Humala challenged by allies and the popular sector

Saturday, July 7th, 2012

Twelve civilians have died in repression of social protests in the first year of this president’s term

[Translation of an article from Brasil de Fato of São Paulo for July 3, 2012. See original here and related articles here, here, here and here.]

by Marcio Zonta

Ollanta Humala Tasso finishes his first year in office in the midst of contradictions. In the first week of June alone, the Gana Perú congressional caucus, the base of the Partido Nacionalista Peruano, suffered four losses, for a total of five resignations of congress members who do not approve of the directions taken by the current administration.

Absorbed in the controversial issues of mining and the army’s confrontations in the Peruvian jungles with supposed drug traffickers and members of Sendero Luminoso, Humala has shown little aptitude or receptiveness to dialogue. On the other hand, he shows an extreme readiness for military solutions. (more…)

Humala: “I will make every effort to heal Peru’s fractures”

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

[Abridged translation of an article from El Comercio of Lima for June 12, 2011. See original here. El Comercio was an ardent supporter of Keiko Fujimori, Ollanta Humala’s opponent in the presidential elections, one result of which was that Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa, who supported Humala as the lesser of two evils, cancelled publication of his weekly column, “Piedra de Toque,” in El Comercio. The politically conservative writer said the paper had violated journalistic standards in its all-out support for the rightist Fujimori.]

By Milagros Leiva Gálvez

“Come quick, maybe Ollanta will give you an interview.” That was the message I got at four in the afternoon, Wednesday, June 8. President-elect Ollanta Humala was seeing members of congress, businessmen and officials at the Los Delfines Hotel and interviewing him was usually an impossiblity. I left on the run. At the hotel, Blanca Rosales, the woman who had been his principal advisor in dealing with the press, told me he didn’t have much time. The president of the congress was expected, the Nicaraguan ambassador, the transition team.

That morning the mayor of Lima, Susana Villarán, had been there and the businessmen. The president-elect was leaving for Brazil that same night. “You only have 30 minutes,” Blanca told me and I gave her a disappointed look. Accustomed to speaking to politicians for over an hour, I made decisions in seconds… (more…)