Posts Tagged ‘Dilma Rousseff’

Brazil: A platform to please the bankers

Monday, September 1st, 2014
((Marina Silva))

((Marina Silva))

An ecologically correct Thatcherite in the court of candidate Marina Silva

[Translation of an article from Página12 of Buenos Aires, Argentina, for August 25, 2014. See original here and related articles here and here.]

By Dario Pignotti

Ever since the environmentalist leader announced she will run in the presidential election, the only person in her entourage to offer details on her platform has been María Alice Setúbal, of the dynasty that founded and still runs the most important private bank in Brazil.

((María Alice Setúbal))

((María Alice Setúbal))

María Alice Setúbal has promised that if Marina is chosen in the October 5 election, the future administration, beginning on January 1, 2015, will do away with President Dilma Rousseff’s heterodoxies, detested in the financial community, where she is described as a “statist and interventionist.”

Marina Silva (of the Brazilian Socialist Party) is diametrically opposite Dilma (of the Workers’ Party), Setúbal explained, since the ecologist’s economic plan “focuses on clear points, stressing tax reform and fiscal responsibility,” to be achieved by cutting expenses and shrinking the state. Marina, in second place in the polls, with 21 percent of the intended vote, 15 points below Dilma, was named candidate last Wednesday shortly after the death of former Socialist Party presidential candidate Eduardo Campos in an airplane crash in São Paulo. (more…)

Brazil: What workers can expect from the three leading presidential candidates

Monday, August 25th, 2014

candidates [Translation of an article from Carta Maior of São Paulo for August 23, 2014. See original here.]

By Najla Passos

Brasilia – The Departamento Intersindical de Assessoria Parlamentar (DIAP – Inter-Union Department for Parliamentary Consultation) has no doubt that of the three leading candidates President Dilma Rousseff is the one who can best assure moving forward on the workers’ agenda. According to the organization’s director of research, Antônio Augusto Queiroz, their conclusion is based on a combination of data taken from the candidates’ platforms, a close examination of each candidate’s political profile, an analysis of the correlation of forces they will have to face in parliament and, mainly, an evaluation of the advisers who surround them.

“Campaign platforms conceal more than they reveal. They are all made for winning elections. So citizens should pay attention to platforms because they give clues, to the candidates’ speeches, which also help, but mainly to the people who surround the candidates, who will form their team if they are elected. No president does anything in isolation. What they do begins with what their team thinks, with what their team puts together,” he states. (more…)

Brazil: Hostility against Dilma has a color and a class

Monday, June 23rd, 2014

The Brazil that cheers for the team at home and in public places reacts to the elite who paid high prices to curse President Dilma Rousseff

[Translation of an article from Carta Maior of São Paulo for June 15, 2014. See original here and related articles here,  here and here.]

By Najla Passos

Brasilia – President Dilma Rousseff reacted on Friday to the curses she heard from the privileged fans who could afford the admission prices set by FIFA for the opening match of the World Cup in Itaquerão, in São Paulo.

During the inauguration of the first stage of the southern line of the BRT (Bus Rapid Transit) in the Federal District, one more of the “World Cup projects,” which they kept telling us would never be ready, she recalled that not even the physical assaults she suffered during the dictatorship intimidated her to the point of diverting her from her path and that of her companions. (more…)

Brazil: Truth and impunity

Sunday, March 30th, 2014

[Translation of an article from Carta Maior of São Paulo for March 27, 2014. See original here. On March 31, 1964, Brazilian military forces, with the full support of the United States under President Lyndon Johnson, overthrew center-left President João Goulart. The coup in Brazil came six months after the US-backed coup against Dominican President Juan Bosch during the Kennedy presidency. The military ruled Brazil until they were replaced by an elected government in 1985.]

coupFifty years after the coup that toppled the government of João Goulart, the truth about what happened is beginning gradually to surface

By Eric Nepomuceno

On the eve of the 50th anniversary of the civilian-military coup that toppled the government of João “Jango” Goulart and initiated a 21-year dictatorship, there is a little of everything in Brazil. Some are nostalgic, some have forgotten those evil times and some are indifferent, believing that turning to the past is unnecessary. And the latter are the majority, the keepers of a very revealing silence about Brazilians’ chronic terror during a dreadful past.

And there are a few – very few – agents of state terrorism who, for some reason, have chosen to tell part of what they know. In this way, the truth is beginning gradually to be uncovered. This occurs with the support of a contorted and despicable amnesty law decreed by the military as the dictatorship was beginning to decline and ratified four years ago by the Supreme Court in a manner as surprising as it was cowardly. (more…)

Brazil: Meaning and perspectives of the demonstrations

Sunday, June 30th, 2013

robert lobato xAn interviw with João Pedro Stedile of the Landless Workers’ Movement

[Translation of an interview from Brasil de Fato of São Paulo for June 25, 2013. See original here.]

by Nilton Viana

It’s time for the government to join the people or it will pay the price in the future. That is one of the assessments of João Pedro Stedile of the national leadership of the Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (MST – Landless Workers’ Movement) concerning the recent demonstrations throughout the country. He believes there is an urban crisis in Brazilian cities brought on by the present stage of finance capitalism. “People are living in hell in the large cities, spending three, four hours a day traveling, when they could be with their families, studying or taking part in cultural activities,” he declares. The MST leader believes the reduction of fares mattered greatly to all the people and that this was a correct position on the part of the Movimento Passe Livre (Free Fare Movement), which was able to call demonstrations in the name of the people’s interests.

In this exclusive interview with Brasil de Fato, Stedile talks about the character of these mobilizations and makes an appeal: we should be conscious of the nature of the demonstrations and all take to the streets to contend for hearts and minds in order to politicize these youth, who have no experience with the class struggle. “The young are fed up with this kind of bourgeois, mercantile politics,” he holds. And he warns: the most serious part is that the parties of the institutional Left, all of them, have adopted these methods. They have grown old and bureaucratic. The popular forces and the parties of the Left need to direct all their energy toward taking to the streets, since what is happening in every city, in every demonstration, is an ideological dispute in the struggle over class interests. “We need to explain to the people who their principal enemies are.”
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(more…)

Relations between Brazil and Venezuela after Chávez

Monday, May 6th, 2013

[Translation of an article from Carta Maior of Brazil for May 3, 2013.  See original here.]

By Marcel Gomes

Rio de Janeiro – The strengthening of relations between Brazil and Venezuela during the administrations of Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva and Hugo Chávez will allow Brasilia and Caracas to maintain close political and economic ties, even after the death of the Venezuelan.

Those who hold this view are supported by the high degree of institutionalization of the bilateral relations. The new president, Nicolás Maduro, has at his disposal UNASUR (Unión de Naciones Suramericanas – Union of South American Nations) and MERCOSUR (Mercado Común del Sur – Southern Common Market), energy projects, local branches of IPEA (Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada – Institute of Applied Economic Research), EMBRAPA (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária – Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation) and Caixa (Caixa Econômica Federal – Brazilian publicly owned bank), as well as a commercial exchange that has jumped from 800 million US dollars to six billion reais [about three billion dollars] in a decade – 80 percent of it, keep in mind, to Brazil’s benefit. (more…)

Brazil: Ten years with the Workers’ Party in office

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013

[Translation of an article from Página/12 of Buenos Aires, Argentina, for January 7, 2013. See original here.]

By Eric Nepomuceno

Last Tuesday, the first day of 2013, besides marking the first two anniversaries of the Dilma Rousseff administration, marked as well ten years in power for the Workers’ Party (PT — Partido dos Trabalhadores). The first party declaring itself leftist to elect a president of Brazil, the PT elected, then re-elected, the first unionist, Lula da Silva, and the first woman, Dilma Rousseff, in the most populous country in Latin America and the country with the strongest economy.

It is certainly a very different party from what it was ten years ago. And much more different from twenty-some years ago, when radical discourse kept a wilfull Lula from attaining the right to occupy the presidency. It has been its more moderate phase and, principally, the strategy put in place by the then president of the party, José Dirceu, that allowed the PT to win the 2002 elections and to begin a stage that may in the end add up to a total of 16 years in power. According to the most recent polls, the party is the clear favorite for the 2014 elections, whether Dilma runs for re-election or Lula chooses to return. (more…)

Brazil: Feminists support new minister and expect debate on abortion

Monday, February 13th, 2012

Rousseff selects Eleonora Menicucci to head women’s ministry

[Translation of an article from Carta Maior of São Paulo for Feburary 8. See original here and related articles here and here. Newly appointed head of the Women’s Policy Secretariat, sociologist Eleonora Menicucci, is a former guerrilla fighter who spent time in prison together with President Dilma Rousseff during the military dictatorship. An outspoken feminist, she says she is bisexual and has had two abortions. Brazilian law makes abortion illegal unless the woman’s life is in danger or the pregnancy results from rape. A woman who terminates her pregnancy illegally can be imprisoned for one to three years.]  

By Najla Passos

Brasilia – The feminist movement has celebrated the choice of activist Eleonora Menicucci de Oliveira to head the Secretaria de Políticas para as Mulheres (SPM –Women’s Policy Secretariat). Aware of the limits inherent in leadership by any individual, activists for the cause believe that the new minister, who will assume office on Friday, January 10, will succeed in advancing the controversial debate on the legalization of abortion in Brazil. And they point out many other challenges Eleonora will face as head of the ministry. (more…)

Brazil prepared to accept Haitian families, Rousseff says, but not traffickers

Saturday, February 4th, 2012

[Translation of an article from AlterPresse Haïti for January 2, 2012. See original here and related articles here, here and here.]

Port-au-Prince, February 2 – “We are ready to accept Haitian citizens who would choose to seek new opportunities in Brazil,” Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff told the press during a brief visit to Port-au-Prince on February 1.

Brazil, which desires to be sensitive to Haitian social, economic and humanitarian difficulties, has created a category of permanent visa exclusively for Haitians.

The country can “admit under that type of visa as many as 1,200 Haitian families a year… for a period of five years,” the head of state specified. (more…)

Floods in Brazil: The tragedy is repeated, the shame persists

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

((Página/12 photo))

[Translation of an article from Página/12 of Buenos Aires, Argentina, for January 14, 2012. See original here.]

By Eric Nepomuceno
In Río de Janeiro

It rains, and it rains hard. In several parts of Minas Gerais, in different regions of the Brazilian southeast and in the mountains neighboring Río, it is only with the help of the gods that one gets through the daily threat of being eliminated because nothing is to be expected from the government.

Exactly one year ago, the summer storms washed away two cities in the neighboring mountainous region – Teresópolis and Nova Friburgo – and caused heavy damage in a third, the most beautiful and important, Petrópolis. The tally of destruction was 918 dead and 215 missing, who surely are dead as well. It was the greatest disaster provoked by climate change ever recorded in Brazil. (more…)

João Pedro Stédile of the Landless Workers’ Movement

Friday, September 9th, 2011

“Brazil’s solutions won’t work for Mexico”

[Translation of an article from La Jornada of Mexico City for September 4, 2011. See original here.]

By Arturo Cano

The subject is Brazil, that “miracle” so admired by Mexicans of the left and the right, of the top and the bottom. And João Pedro Stédile, founder and leader of the Movimento dos Sem Terra (MST – Landless Workers’ Movement) of Brazil talks about it: “Mexicans think that we have solved all our problems and we haven’t even solved the soccer problem.”

Stédile has been in Mexico for only a few days now but he knows this country well because he was here a few decades ago as a graduate student in the Universidad Nacional. With that familiarity, he is surprised that Mexican governors and intellectuals never tire of talking about Brazil and Petrobras as models. “Don’t take us as a model for anything. You are okay here with the Under-17 [World Cup soccer games],” this white bearded man says laughingly, looking like a university professor, the descendant of Italian immigrants, born in Rio Grande do Sul where Brazilians, he agrees, look like Argentines and Uruguayans. (more…)

Obama does not want Brazil on UN Security Council

Sunday, February 6th, 2011

US diplomat says president opposes country’s permanent membership and will avoid topic during March visit

[Translation of an article from Estadão of São Paulo for February 6. See original here and related articles here and here.]

By Denise Chrispim Marin

United States President Barack Obama is not likely to bring up support for Brazil’s membership in the UN Security Council during his visit to the country in March. The White House and US diplomats are working to skirt inevitable embarassing questions [on the topic] from the press in order to avoid damage to their project of relaunching bilateral relations…

According to a State Department source, any change in Washington’s position is a remote possibility. It would be a “miracle.” As far as the US government is concerned, Brazil committed a “mortal sin” in June when it voted against a Security Council resolution on new sanctions against Iran.

The Brazilian action was more serious than its insistent attempts to reach a nuclear accord with Iran because “it compromised the very credibility of the system” and revealed signs of interference by former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva and former Chancellor Celso Amorim in the most sensitve foreign policy decisions. “It was a blunder,” the source said.

It is still not clear to the State Department whether the administration of Dilma Rousseff, as a continuation of the Lula administration, will continue on the same path in foreign affairs.

The doubt will be resolved on the 23rd when Foreign Minister Antônio Patriota will make his first visit to US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in Washington.

This will be the first opportunity for dialogue between the US and Brazil on restructuring the Security Council, which is still pending in the UN.