Posts Tagged ‘North American Free Trade Agreement’

Mexico: University forum examines Peña Nieto’s energy privatization and US national security

Saturday, November 16th, 2013

[Translation of an article from La Jornada of Mexico City for Novembr 12, 2013. See original here.]

By Elizabeth Velasco C.

Mexico City – The privatization of the Mexican energy sector serves the interests of the United States government, which, for national security reasons, requires an assured supply of oil, gas and water during the course of the first half of the 21st century, according to Josefina Morales and Carlos Fazio, professors at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, and José Antonio Almazán, a representative of retirees of the Sindicato Mexicano de Electricistas (Mexican Electrician’s Union), and Jesús Ramírez of the executive committee of the Movimiento de Regeneración Nacional (MORENA – Movement for National Regeneration).

The panelists concurred on the description of Enrique Peña Nieto’s energy reform as “the outcome of 30 years of neoliberal reforms imposed since Ronald Reagan’s presidential campaign,” which have already brought to Mexico “a war of plunder of its strategic resources and the social gains bequeathed by the Mexican revolution.” (more…)

Guatemala, free trade and the campesinos

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

hernandez1[Translation of an article from Carta Maior of São Paulo, Brazil, for October 12, 2013. See original here and related articles here, here and here.]

By Leonardo Wexell Severo

In an interview with Carta Maior, Daniel Pascual Hernández, coordinator general of the Comité de Unidad Campesina (CUC) of Guatemala, explains the motives that drive about one of every nine Guatemalans to migrate to the United States and points out the effects of the Free Trade Agreements, of embassies being turned into business offices for multinational corporations in the Caribbean. “The spoils of war are in the presidency, the business center for concessions, for the privatization of the national heritage,” he declares.
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Carta Maior: How does the Comité de Unidad Campesina analyze the present clashes in the Guatemalan countryside?

Daniel Pascual Hernández: We have a high level of concentration of land ownership, which makes the struggle over land in Guatemala quite similar to those in Brazil and Latin America as a whole. From the agrarian point of view, capitalism was instituted in 1871, with coffee, cotton and later with bananas, raw materials for export. That monoculture brought with it a peculiarity: the concentration of land together with the oppression of the indigenous. The law on land began by handing the territory over to the invaders, the colonialists, leaving aside belts so the indigenous would not revolt. There was a period of advances from 1944 to 1954, the decade of democracy, under the governments of Juan José Arévalo and Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán, but then came the United States invasion. (more…)

What is going on with Mexico?

Monday, June 17th, 2013

[Translation of a blog from Carta Maior of São Paulo, Brazil, for June 15, 2013. See original here.]

By Emir Sader

Mexico was in the vanguard of neoliberalism in Latin America. Among the first on the continent to apply that model, it linked it with the first regional adhesion to a Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, signed in 1994 with the US and Canada.

It thought it was going to profit immensely from its border with the greatest economy in the world, distancing itself from a Latin America with a poor showing in the 1990s, and definitively joining North America. Since then, more than 90 % of its foreign trade is with the US; it has practically no trade with China or India and very small exchanges with South America — the most dynamic axes of the world economy. (more…)